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time, their workers but that comes with a cost to the whole economy, making it less dynamic, less easy for businesses to hire more workers and at a time when we have 8% unemployment, that's not something that a lot of businesses can afford. >> now, a lot of those same union leaders say, you get what you pay for, and there are offering cut raitt salaries to workers who might appreciate the jobs, but in the end, aren't going to be very happy in those jobs. what do you think? >> i think overall people are gibbing to see that unions are out to help union worker but very often at the expense of nonunion works and that's where we're getting in trouble. the american public at large is overwhelmingly moving sort of -- public support is moving against unions, gallup found that 42% would like to see unions be less influential. they feel at if there are negotiations going on for union workers but they come at a cost for all workers, creating less opportunity for all workers and for the economy at large. what is the message. you say lab you wins every time. unions say, cheaper labor has a cos
. >> we must not permit and artificial debt ceiling to throw the country into default and our economy into chaos and depression, which is exactly what the republicans are threatening to do. jon: some conservative groups warn that removing the limit is a recipe for economic disaster, as we're seeing now in greece. the leaders of heritage action family research council and club for growth writing in an op ed they want congress to balance the budget within ten years and keep it balanced. quote, no american should have to tell an eight-year-old child that we cannot get our nation's house in order by the time she goes to college. there are many ways to get to a d republicans haved both an obligation to explain what path they will choose. jonah goldberg is editor at large for national review online, he's also a fox news contributor. get rid of the debt ceiling all together? jonah, what do you think about that idea? >> well i don't think it's a disaster if we got rid of the debt ceiling but i'm not in favor of getting rid of the debt ceiling. most countries don't have a debt ceiling. you sti
of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable. jon: that's the $4 trillion that he is talking, talking about, sg that if you can cut $4 trillion in spending, that's going to make thingsings hunky dory. is it? >> with well, no, i would say no. for the reasons doug suggests that $4 trillion isn't really $4 trillion. if it were a real $4 trillion, it would be an effective patch, a short-term fix. what it will not do, however, is change the long-term debt trajectory of the country, and there's really no discussion, particularly discussion that involves the white house on a serious level about changing the debt trajectory of the country. you're not hearing from the president proposals for long-term, structural entitlement reform which everybody in washington, b everybody who's paid even cursory attention to these issues understands is what's really driving our debt. jon: and i just have to let our viewers know that steve is not a marionette, there are cables behind his head for the window washers -- [laughter] who are getting ready to clean the windows t
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)